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laughingsquid:

‘Ocean Atlas’, A Massive Underwater Figure Sculpture in the Bahamas That Doubles as an Artificial Reef
 
12:58 am, reblogged by dwntherabbithole,




fvanjik:

THIS HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH MY BLOG IM JUST LAUGHING SO HARDmoment of silence 4 ppl who have to deal with surprise dick pics

fvanjik:

THIS HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH MY BLOG
IM JUST LAUGHING SO HARD
moment of silence 4 ppl who have to deal with surprise dick pics

(Source: rawunmedicatedheartt)

12:55 am, reblogged by dwntherabbithole,




put-him-in-custardy:

this is how Parks and Recreation explained Chris Pratt’s weight loss for Guardians of the Galaxy 

put-him-in-custardy:

this is how Parks and Recreation explained Chris Pratt’s weight loss for Guardians of the Galaxy 

12:54 am, reblogged by dwntherabbithole,




3:53 pm, reblogged by dwntherabbithole,




thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

manta-rays-on-gallifrey:

neilnevins:

stunningpicture:

A seahorse admiring his own reflection from a divers watch.

or maybe he’s checking the fucking time. seahorses got places to go too y’know

The seahorse is one of the slowest fish in the ocean, the smallest able to move themselves at about 6 feet per hour. So if that seahorse has someplace to be I hope they’ve left a lot of time to get there.

"There is no way I am going to be able to pick the kids up from soccer practice now…"
thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

manta-rays-on-gallifrey:

neilnevins:

stunningpicture:

A seahorse admiring his own reflection from a divers watch.

or maybe he’s checking the fucking time. seahorses got places to go too y’know

The seahorse is one of the slowest fish in the ocean, the smallest able to move themselves at about 6 feet per hour. So if that seahorse has someplace to be I hope they’ve left a lot of time to get there.

"There is no way I am going to be able to pick the kids up from soccer practice now…"

thefingerfuckingfemalefury:

manta-rays-on-gallifrey:

neilnevins:

stunningpicture:

A seahorse admiring his own reflection from a divers watch.

or maybe he’s checking the fucking time. seahorses got places to go too y’know

The seahorse is one of the slowest fish in the ocean, the smallest able to move themselves at about 6 feet per hour. So if that seahorse has someplace to be I hope they’ve left a lot of time to get there.

"There is no way I am going to be able to pick the kids up from soccer practice now…"

 
12:53 pm, reblogged by dwntherabbithole,




5:13 pm, reblogged by dwntherabbithole,




9:21 pm, reblogged by dwntherabbithole,




3:42 pm, reblogged by dwntherabbithole,




9:31 pm, reblogged by dwntherabbithole,




biomedicalephemera:

Carnivora!
All members of the order Carnivora fall into one of two sub-orders: Feliformia (cat-like), or Caniformia (dog-like). Outward appearance of carnivora can be deceiving; most people would classify the hyena and aard-wolf as “dog-like”, while the weasels and pole-martens are commonly considered “cat-like”, which they are not.
The Feliformidae are obligate carnivores; that is, they must eat meat to survive, as their body cannot produce one or more nutrients that cannot be found in plants, or that their digestive tracts cannot absorb large amounts of non-animal matter. They are not all hypercarnivorans (meat making up >70% of the diet), however. The order Feliformia includes all of the cats (Felidae), mongooses and meerkats (Herpestidae), hyenas (Hyaenidae), civets and genets (Viverridae), as well as two very small families: the Nandiniidae, which contains only the African palm civet; and the Prionodontidae, which contains the two Asiatic linsangs. 
Caniformidae include the seals, sea lions, and walruses (Pinnipedia); true dogs (Canidae); bears (Ursidae); skunks (Mephitidae); badgers, weasels, and otters (Mustelidae); raccoons, coatis, and kinkajous (Procyonidae); and the family containing only the red panda (Ailuridae).
Most Caniformidae (except for the Canidae, interestingly enough) are plantigrade - that is, they walk on all of their podial and tarsal bones on the ground at the same time. This affords greater stability and weight-bearing ability and is helpful when standing your ground or trying to balance in trees.
The Feliformidae (and the true dogs, or Canidae) are almost completely digitigrade - they walk on just their finger and toe bones, and have elongated “heel” bones and Achilles tendons. Digitigrade animals can move much more quickly and quietly than plantigrade animals, and their specialized “heels” allow for spring-type motion, like what you see in cats. 
Huge h/t to the ever-awesome Emily Graslie of The Brain Scoop for finding the words to simplify something I’ve wanted to post on for a while ;D Go watch The Brain Scoop and get smart!
More on Tetrapodal Locomotion!The Brain Scoop
Images from:[Wolverine, Walrus] American Animals. Witmer Stone and William Everett Cram, 1902.
[Spotted Hyena, California Sea Lion] The Book of the Animal Kingdom: Mammals. W. Percivall Westell, 1910.
[Black-Footed Ferret, Polar Bear] Quadrupeds of North America. John James Audubon, 1851.
[Kinkajou, Lion] Dictionnaire Universel d’Histoire Naturelle. M. Charles d’Orbigny, 1849.

biomedicalephemera:

Carnivora!

All members of the order Carnivora fall into one of two sub-orders: Feliformia (cat-like), or Caniformia (dog-like). Outward appearance of carnivora can be deceiving; most people would classify the hyena and aard-wolf as “dog-like”, while the weasels and pole-martens are commonly considered “cat-like”, which they are not.

The Feliformidae are obligate carnivores; that is, they must eat meat to survive, as their body cannot produce one or more nutrients that cannot be found in plants, or that their digestive tracts cannot absorb large amounts of non-animal matter. They are not all hypercarnivorans (meat making up >70% of the diet), however. The order Feliformia includes all of the cats (Felidae), mongooses and meerkats (Herpestidae), hyenas (Hyaenidae), civets and genets (Viverridae), as well as two very small families: the Nandiniidae, which contains only the African palm civet; and the Prionodontidae, which contains the two Asiatic linsangs. 

Caniformidae include the seals, sea lions, and walruses (Pinnipedia); true dogs (Canidae); bears (Ursidae); skunks (Mephitidae); badgers, weasels, and otters (Mustelidae); raccoons, coatis, and kinkajous (Procyonidae); and the family containing only the red panda (Ailuridae).

Most Caniformidae (except for the Canidae, interestingly enough) are plantigrade - that is, they walk on all of their podial and tarsal bones on the ground at the same time. This affords greater stability and weight-bearing ability and is helpful when standing your ground or trying to balance in trees.

The Feliformidae (and the true dogs, or Canidae) are almost completely digitigrade - they walk on just their finger and toe bones, and have elongated “heel” bones and Achilles tendons. Digitigrade animals can move much more quickly and quietly than plantigrade animals, and their specialized “heels” allow for spring-type motion, like what you see in cats. 

Huge h/t to the ever-awesome Emily Graslie of The Brain Scoop for finding the words to simplify something I’ve wanted to post on for a while ;D Go watch The Brain Scoop and get smart!

More on Tetrapodal Locomotion!
The Brain Scoop

Images from:

[Wolverine, Walrus] American Animals. Witmer Stone and William Everett Cram, 1902.

[Spotted Hyena, California Sea Lion] The Book of the Animal Kingdom: Mammals. W. Percivall Westell, 1910.

[Black-Footed Ferret, Polar Bear] Quadrupeds of North America. John James Audubon, 1851.

[Kinkajou, Lion] Dictionnaire Universel d’Histoire Naturelle. M. Charles d’Orbigny, 1849.

8:29 am, reblogged by dwntherabbithole,